A Personal God

When I peruse the religious landscape of America, it sometimes baffles me how people can claim to read the Bible, love the Bible, and follow the Bible while remaining completely oblivious to the true nature of the God of the Bible. Some see only a harsh, judging God who destroyed the peoples of Canaan, punished people for their rebellion, and allowed Israel to endure the destruction of their homeland and years in captivity. Others only see the loving God whose grace sent Jesus to the cross for the sins of mankind (John 3:16). The apostle Paul emphasized that both of these descriptions apply to God but should be viewed together in a balanced way (Rom. 11:22). However, more than this, some have allowed their view of Christianity to rely on ritual and habit rather than heart and commitment. Theologians then offer a doctrinal interpretation of God as if Yahweh can be parsed and defined like goodness or atonement. And while all these fall under the purview of God, appreciating how they unite together to provide guidance and hope both in this life and beyond this life is where we find the true meaning of all that God has done for us. 

Indeed, when we turn to Psalm 105 and consider both its placement within this inspired collection and its content, we should be humbled in both our understanding of the LORD and our appreciation for what He has done. Our God is not some impersonal deity who formed this world and then abandoned His creation. To the contrary, the LORD has supreme interest in every aspect of our lives, and He has acted accordingly to make a relationship with Him possible. Therefore, He not only established the laws of nature by His providence but then brought man into a covenant relationship with Him. Moreover, we can see this not only in the love displayed in Jesus in the New Testament but even in His care demonstrated in the Old. For this reason the psalmist could encourage the people to worship God, talk about all that He has done, give Him glory, rejoice, and seek Him diligently (Psa. 105:1-6). Everything that God has done is designed to draw us back to Him so that we can say, “He is the LORD our God; His judgments are in all the earth” (Psa. 105:7).

The LORD established His covenant of both the promised seed and the land of Canaan, renewed it in successive generations, and ultimately fulfilled it (Psa. 105:8-11). When Israel was but an insignificant family, wandering with other nomads throughout the land, He protected them from harm in keeping with His covenant (Psa. 105:12-15; Gen. 20). In His providence, He used the anger and sin of Joseph’s brothers ultimately to bring about their own provision, raising Joseph up from a slave and a prisoner to the viceroy of the Pharaoh (Psa. 105:16-22). The LORD then turned Jacob’s family into such a multitude that their Egyptian hosts grew to fear them (Psa. 105:23-25) and then enslave them, but God had greater plans for them. He sent Moses, and Aaron with him, to bring them out of bondage so He could fulfill His covenant, sending plagues upon the Egyptians as both proof and punishment for them and proof of His fidelity to His covenant(Psa. 105:26-36). He took a nation of slaves and gave them wealth, challenged a mighty nation and brought them to their knees, guided His people day and night, and gave them food and water as they had need (Psa. 105:37-41). He did all these things to keep the covenant He made with Abraham and with the design that the people would then keep the covenant with Him (Psa. 105:42-45).

God keeps promises to His people. God protects His people. God provides for His people. God prepares His people. God proves His faithfulness time and time again. God prevails over all worldly obstacles. God makes all good things possible. He provides personal care with personal attention out of very personal love for all of His creation (Rom. 5:8-9). Why? Because He wants us to respond to Him personally with loving obedience (John 14:15). The LORD is a personal God, and that is why we should take what He has done for us personally.

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Waiting

Waiting. It does not matter whether you experience it sitting at the doctor’s office, standing in line buying groceries, or doing a little of both at the local DMV; waiting can prove quite trying. Waiting presents numerous difficulties for people bound by time because it highlights various uncertainties that characterize our existence upon the earth. Most uncertainties create discomfort because they simply reflect and amplify how much lies outside of our personal control. This actually lies behind the human desire to impose explanations for events beyond what the evidence (or reason) indicates. Conspiracy theories exist to comfort our human uncertainty, providing an explanation when none other is readily available. Sadly, this often leads people to attempt to superimpose some human control or blame over events (such as various natural disasters) where none exists. In similar fashion, the uncertainty inherent in waiting challenges man in another way. It forces each of us to accept that we cannot control everything, nor should we try. Instead, we should remember and live according to the One who is actually in control.

The whole of Psalm 94 revolves around this very theme: waiting. And yet, in typical poetic fashion, the psalmist walks the reader through the challenges present with having to wait to the climax of faith that the godly should both learn and employ while waiting. Nevertheless, the message of the psalm does not lie simply in an exhortation to wait, but in how to do so in a manner harmonious with faith. Therefore, do not simply wait, but wait calmly. Wait calmly for God to establish His justice rather than indignantly inflicting your own (Psa. 94:1). We have no right to judge others by our own standards. Instead, we must calmly wait for God to punish in accordance with his own (Psa. 94:2). We must also learn to wait patiently, judging success not by the trouble of the moment but by the certainty of eternity (Psa. 94:3). This further demands that we evaluate the wicked not by the mirage of power they have in the moment but by their insolence and ignorance (Psa. 94:4-7) because God knows best, and that includes knowing the best timing, including for judgment (Psa. 94:8-9). Fulfilling these things requires that we also wait humbly rather than haughtily making demands, both on others and on God. In every situation, no matter how negative, we should humbly look for what we can learn instead of seeking only to reinforce what we think we already know (Psa. 94:10-11). While it takes discipline, humility can help us see the blessings involved even in adversity, an essential trait for maturity (Psa. 94:12-13). Therefore, learn to think in terms of God’s character and your personal responsibility (Psa. 94:14-15). Nevertheless, when we approach waiting in faith, we can cast aside some of the uncertainty and wait confidently because of what God has promised. We can have confidence in His protection when seen from the right point of view (Psa. 94:16; Psa. 16:1), confidence in His help to provide the aid we need through life (Psa. 94:17), and confidence in His mercy through the trials we face (Psa. 94:18). Thus, our confidence does not derive from some promise of invincibility but from a relationship with the One in control of eternity. For this reason, we should always wait faithfully for God. When we trust His ability to handle our problems, we need not worry (Psa. 94:19; Phil. 4:6-7). When we trust God’s character, knowing He will do what is right and best for us, we remove doubt and uncertainty from the big picture of life and replace it with faith (Psa. 94:20-21). When we trust God’s will, we no longer feel an obligation to enforce our own on others (Psa. 94:22-23). God can take care of it.

Waiting reveals much about our relationship with God. It can reveal our trust or expose our doubt. It can demonstrate our maturity or prove how much growth is still needed. Waiting does not get easier with time; it gets easier with faith.

Refuge in Life

In God We Trust. The national motto of the United States of America rings hollow today considering the rampant march toward immorality perpetrated by her government. And yet this hypocrisy demonstrates, by its irony, the importance of real trust. Throughout the Bible, trust always serves as the central characteristic of a strong relationship with God. Broken trust severs that relationship. Hollow trust ignores it. Binding trust restores it. But perfect trust established it. The beautiful prophecy of the Messianic Psalm 91 illustrates this latter fact perfectly. The wording of the pronouns throughout this psalm make it difficult to establish the extent of the application intended. However, it would appear that the inspired anonymous psalmist (perhaps Moses in a sequel to Psalm 90) developed the theme of personal trust in the LORD (Heb. 11:6) that Satan applied to Jesus directly in the process of temptation (Matt. 4:6) and that Jesus fulfilled perfectly in overcoming all temptation (Heb. 4:15).

Although many pay lip service to the essentiality of faith toward God, here the psalmist establishes that God Himself must be the epicenter of our trust. And yet this is no mere passive belief in a Creator but a meaningful and personal trust based upon a deep understanding and appreciation for who God is—the Most High, who transcends His creation; the Almighty, who governs His creation; My God, who has the power to help His creation; and the LORD—Yahweh—who, in offering a covenant relationship, is always there for His creation (Psa. 91:1-2). This is the substance of trust, and living by faith is its manifestation (2 Cor. 5:7). However, contrary to modern applications that equate faith with wish fulfillment, trusting God is a direct response to what God Himself has offered us. As the psalmist develops His theme, he offers three examples of what God has spoken that both require and deserve our trust. He has given us truth by which w can build spiritual knowledge as a foundation for life (Psa. 91:3-4; John 17:17). He has offered His protection for His people in day to day care so that we need not live life in fear (Psa. 91:5-8). This does not relieve us of responsibility or keep us from all pain and discomfort in life, as Jesus Himself saw and experienced, but it reminds us of God’s presence and care even during the trials that go with the nature of this life (Heb. 13:5-6). Third, God has made us precious promises, especially in regard to His providence (Psa. 91:9-13). This is not magical safety net against harm, but it surely demonstrates that God can operate within nature by angelic means to turn events as He wishes for the benefit of His people. In the final section of this beautiful poem (Psa. 91:14-16), the inspired writer offers God’s own response to faith that trusts Him completely: a listening ear, promised presence, deliverance and victory, and blessing and salvation in life. He promises a great future.

Jesus, as even Satan recognized, lived by this kind of trust. He died still holding fast to this kind of trust. And God rewarded Him for having this kind of trust. And the beauty of what Jesus accomplished by doing so is that we who trust Him and what He did can enjoy the same reward (John 14:1-6).

Number Your Days

In our youth we tend to anticipate the future with a sense of certainty that only the naive can possess. As we mature into adulthood, we embrace the challenges before us with fresh eyes and ready energy, but with no experience and little understanding of what lies ahead. Mid-life comes faster upon us than we could ever have expected. The constant drone of responsibility and necessity drown out the earlier thrill of ambition and replace it with the burden of history and reality. As age advances, difficulties of daily living create new challenges, so that as experience, knowledge, and time combine to create wisdom, perspective toward life grows ever more reflective and spiritual. Such we notice in the words of Moses in the prayer recorded for our benefit as Psalm 90.

Perspective about life begins with the realization of just how much man needs God. He provides the place of safety most needed by every soul for all time (Psa. 90:1). While man remains limited, frail, and bound by time, God transcends all of these to provide everything man requires (Psa. 90:2). Indeed, man only gains perspective by contemplating his ultimate demise (Psa. 90:3), all the while remembering that while men pass through life, God’s existence stands above life itself (Psa. 90:4). Generations rise and fall, but God is there through them all (Psa. 90:5-6). Therefore, the perspective man most needs lies in his recognition that God, standing outside of time and above mankind, will also judge every man (Psa. 90:7) for all our sins, whether hidden or advertised (Psa. 90:8). Despite all man’s bluster, everything we do will be judged by God; therefore, we have nothing to boast of in this life but should humbly live realizing what awaits us in the end (Psa. 90:9). This changes how we see life immensely. Whatever time we have upon the earth, it is short and filled with responsibility (Psa. 90:10) because all that we do will be judged by God. Indeed, death itself should be a constant reminder of that reality (Psa. 90:11). This is why we should spend our days focusing on pleasing God and building that perspective in preparation for eternity (Psa. 90:12). However, along with this, God offers yet another layer to the perspective man should have toward life. God cares for man and wants to help (Psa. 90:13). What a comfort this should be for all of life! He will indeed judge us, but He offers His mercy in the meanwhile to give life joy and meaning (Psa. 90:14). In the difficulties we face upon this earth, which He allows, He also promises to be with us and aid us (Psa. 90:15-16). This final promise, this reality built upon God’s character, offers hope in life and beyond, for God loves to bless and longs to help. He will provide what we need to overcome adversity in life, address the challenges of the world, and prepare for the judgment as we enter eternity (Psa. 90:17).

This is a great God, and serving Him, we can also have a great life. When placed in the context of Moses’ own life and service, finally learning to serve at the age of eighty and getting to view Canaan, his life’s work, shortly before his death, the prayer he offers here can surely motivate us to build a future with God, share our heartaches with God, and thus prepare for an eternity with God.

The Hometown of God’s People

The city of Jerusalem regularly appears in the news throughout the world due to its historical and political significance in the struggle of competing worldviews, religions, and even civilizations. While the current political conflict between Jews and Muslims, clearly seen in various security checkpoints, and the religious conflict represented by the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Wailing Wall speak to the modern division in the city, this merely echoes its role throughout many centuries. However, the Bible introduces the city of Salem as the home of Melchizedek, a priest of the Most High God and Salem’s king (Gen. 14). Centuries later the Israelites found it inhabited by the Jebusites (Jsh. 10) until the children of Judah took the city (Jdg. 1:8), though the Jebusites recaptured it sometime afterward (Jsh. 15:63), remaining in their possession until David recaptured it and made it the capital city (2 Sam. 5), continuing in that capacity until its destruction by the Babylonians in the sixth century B.C. Sometime during the latter portion of this captivity, when Jerusalem still lay in rubble, the sons of Korah likely penned Psalm 87, an ode to Jerusalem, in a sense, that offers hope for the rebirth of the city, looking unto even greater things.

Jerusalem would not return to greatness, however, because of the power of Israel or the grand design of an empire. Rather, the LORD Himself desired its restoration for His purposes, and this made Jerusalem holy (Psa. 87:1). God’s love for the city, rooted in His plan to use it, motivated its rebuilding (Psa. 87:2), so that the basis for its praise is rooted not in the past but in its potential: “Glorious things are spoken of you, O city of God!” (Psa. 87:3). The means and significance of this purpose would center on how Gentiles from Israel’s greatest enemies and from far away lands would one day call Yahweh their God and think of Jerusalem as their place of origin (Psa. 87:4), all due to God’s provision (Psa. 87:5-6). Despite its destruction, which fulfilled God’s will, Jerusalem would become the source of blessing once more (Psa. 87:7).

Under the leadership of Zerubbabel and Ezra, the Jews rebuilt the temple, and under the leadership of Nehemiah, they rebuilt the city. The LORD thus raised Jerusalem from the dead to serve His purposes. But while the Jews rejoiced in the restoration of temple worship, God and this psalm looked beyond the return of the Jews to their capital and pointed to the time when Jerusalem would serve as the place from which Christianity would rise (Acts 2) and offer Gentiles reason to embrace the city with thankfulness because of the message of the gospel that sprang forth from within its walls. Jerusalem deserves to be celebrated and embraced—not simply for its storied history, but for its spiritual significance—not as the capital of a holy land, but as the place from which God made it possible for people of all nations to become His holy people (1 Pet. 2:9-10) and have reason to think of Jerusalem as their hometown.

What Do We Really Need?

All of us are poor and needy at heart, whether we realize it and admit it or not. Indeed, often a stubborn heart and rebellious spirit keeps us from enjoying full access to the depth of God’s care because we refuse to acknowledge our needs, our weaknesses, and our true situation, choosing instead to try to do everything ourselves, including much that is impossible for us to do. Is it then any wonder that anxiety holds sway when we fail to turn to the One available and able to come to our aid? David, despite fighting as a soldier and reigning as king, had a heart for God so tender that he turned regularly to Him in great humility to ask and even plead for the needs of his soul, as Psalm 86 provides more than adequate evidence.

In the first seven verses David calls on God to preserve him, to save him, to show him mercy, and to give him a reason to rejoice by answering his prayer in the affirmative. However, the basis for his request shows how his mindset  differed from how we often see ourselves and therefore approach God. David came to God specifically because he saw himself as “poor and needy” (Psa. 86:1) and because God is so much more: holy, trustworthy, good, ready to forgive, and abundant in mercy. Indeed, David had confidence in coming to God because of how positively God contrasts with man—a concept quite opposite from the 21st century desire to lower God to man’s level. But the LORD’s nature especially qualifies Him to help us because His uniqueness makes Him capable of doing what no one else can do (Psa. 86:8). He alone deserves recognition as truly great and therefore worthy of worship (Psa. 86:9), and He has proven such by the power displayed in miraculous and wondrous works performed in times past. Truly, He alone is God (Psa. 86:10). For this reason, we can have complete confidence in His instruction and guidance (Psa. 86:11). Because of this, we can have confidence in His deliverance (Psa. 86:12-14). But more than that, we can have confidence in all these things because of His character. “But You, O Lord, are a God full of compassion, and gracious, Longsuffering and abundant in mercy and truth” (Psa. 86:15). Surely we have every reason to turn to our God and do His will, because His will is in our best interest, and He cares for us (1 Pet. 5:7).

Only Jehovah God can provide all that we need. And we need Him desperately. Therefore, let us humble our hearts and acknowledge our need, let us realize the great power and mercy of the one true God and reach out to Him with confidence that He will do what is best for us. As long as we live upon this earth, we will face struggles without and struggles within, but through it all, we have a God on whom we can always rely. This is why, regardless of our problems and regardless of our situation, the faithful can lift their voices to heaven and cry, “Oh, turn to me, and have mercy on me! Give Your strength to Your servant, And save the son of Your maidservant. Show me a sign for good, That those who hate me may see it and be ashamed, Because You, LORD, have helped me and comforted me” (Psa. 86:16-17).

The Doorkeeper’s Privilege

Have you ever felt that combination of frustration and longing when you desperately wanted to be somewhere, surrounded by friends and family, but instead found yourself elsewhere by forces outside of your control, practically alone, and daydreaming about all that you were missing? It might have been a family reunion, a concert, or just a group of friends from school getting together to talk about old times. Whatever the occasion, missing it creates a loneliness that gnaws at you deep within. But what if you are missing out on a spiritual reunion, a gathering to worship, and an opportunity of fellowship? If these things truly matter to you, missing them will hurt deeply, because you find yourself separated from the community and the joy that means the most. Faithful Christians who are shut-in and unable to gather with the saints to worship, study, and work—except perhaps occasionally—can appreciate this feeling, knowing how much the simple visit of one brother or sister means in soothing the soul. However, the sons of Korah who penned Psalm 84 understood this as well, and these inspired words capture the essence of longing and the hope of renewal that can provide spiritual solace for those in a similar situation today.

While the exact date of the psalm eludes us, the internal clues provided by the content suggest the words of those swept away in Babylonian captivity, but likely before the destruction of the temple. Thus, one who had ministered in the temple and anticipated journeying to Jerusalem for the annual feasts found himself unable to return but only able to remember and imagine. O how he loved coming before the LORD where He dwelled (Psa. 84:1), and now this had been taken from him; the loss compelled him to cry out (Psa. 84:2). Even birds could take shelter on the temple grounds, while he was left only with his memories (Psa. 84:3). He envisions the journey through the barrenness of the Valley of Baca, but he sees it as an opportunity rather than a burden (Psa. 84:6). Therefore, unable to make the journey, he longs for God to accept his prayer offered in isolation (Psa. 84:8), a prayer asking for protection in difficult circumstances, including for the deposed king led away in shame (Psa. 84:9).

While the background of the psalm has a tinge of sadness, the message centers on spiritual joy. For despite his own situation, he sees what so many forget. (1) Worshiping God, bowing before His presence, and praising His name is a privilege we should not take for granted (Psa. 84:4). (2) When you find your strength in God, the more time you spend with Him and serving Him, the stronger you become (Psa. 84:5, 7). (3) The stronger our faith in God, the more happiness and joy we can allow into our lives, because we will see all that God makes possible (Psa. 84:11-12). He so wanted to experience this once more that he concludes standing on the threshold looking in from the outside to glimpse for just a moment the blessings that come from God are vastly superior to living in comfort in a wicked land: “For a day in Your courts is better than a thousand. I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God Than dwell in the tents of wickedness” (Psa. 84:10). We are not in captivity—not yet. But let us learn from the psalmist and appreciate our blessings today and not wait until they are taken from us.

You Are Gods

The psalmist’s declaration in Psalm 82:6, “You are gods,” has created confusion among Bible students, commentators, and preachers for generations, even with Jesus’ own comment on the passage. The word itself is exactly the same as the word translated “God” throughout the remainder of the psalm, and yet the context clearly dictates that it refers to others. But to whom? That has been the real question. The nature of the word elohim is fairly broad. It is plural and refers either to “mighty ones” or to the “One who is mighty” (though with the plural still present, indicating His majesty, the trinity, or perhaps even both). Some have maintained that the word here refers to angels as does happen on occasion; however, the nature of the responsibilities cited in verses two through four in particular indicate men. But, if so, why did he call them “gods”?

The setting of the psalm provides insight into the structure, the emphasis, and the specific meaning given by Jesus. In the opening verse Asaph presents an ancient courtroom scene with God presiding over all those with some kind of authority, exercising judgment over those mighty ones (Psa. 82:1) similar to how God told Moses that he would be “as God” to Pharaoh (Ex. 4:15-16) and similar in responsibility to those judges Moses appointed at his father-in-law’s recommendation (Ex. 18:25-26). He then presents the accusation as God calls the people in power to account for their failures to judge fairly, essentially charging them with partiality in letting the guilty go free while failing to protect those in need for whose protection the law was given (Psa. 82:2-4). As He brings His argument to a close, He maintains that these people who have been given great authority do not appreciate it or understand the role they have been given, using it selfishly and creating instability in society as a result of their decisions (Psa. 82:5). Thus, in the next two verses He contrasts the greatness of the responsibility with which they were charged with the death sentence against them because of how miserably they have failed to conduct themselves appropriate to the authority given them (Psa. 82:6-7). Therefore, when God told them, “You are gods, And all of you are children of the Most High” (Psa. 82:6), He was emphasizing the responsibility of the authority they had taken on and that they themselves remained under the authority of the Most High God. Therefore, because they had abused that authority, they would suffer the consequences and lose all the authority they had treated as if they had by right instead of by responsibility. However, all judgment depends on the One who judges the earth. The nations are his, and all judgment should reflect the same (Psa. 82:8).

This stinging rebuke of leaders treating themselves as the authority rather than God has many applications. It certainly applies to governmental leaders at every level, as Nebuchadnezzar discovered the hard way (Dan. 4:32). But the emphasis within the psalm goes much deeper because of Israel’s relationship to Yahweh—a name not mentioned in this psalm. Jesus defended Himself and the authority with which He taught and worked using this passage. “Jesus answered them, ‘Is it not written in your law, “I said, ‘You are gods’”? If He called them gods, to whom the word of God came (and the Scripture cannot be broken), do you say of Him whom the Father sanctified and sent into the world, “You are blaspheming,” because I said, “I am the Son of God”?’” (Jn. 10:34-36). The Jews were upset that Jesus called Himself “the Son of God” because of its implications of displaying divine character, which happened by submission. However, Jesus pointed out that He had been given far more authority by God Himself than those judges of old whom God had called “gods.” Therefore, their emphasis on the terminology failed the test of scripture and revealed their lack of substance. But even more than that, Jesus here emphasized the responsibility of fulfilling the role given completely and unselfishly by submitting to God’s will rather than treating it as an earned honor. Leaders should never forget that they exist to serve. No matter how high the office or important the role, in the end all answer to God according to faithfulness in fulfilling His will (Jas. 3:1).

Remember

I will admit that my memory is not what it used to be. When I was younger, I remembered vocabulary words quickly and easily, information for tests pretty well, and a lot of trivial information better than most. At one time I could have told you the starting lineup for the Dallas Cowboys for the first twenty years of their existence, and I could remember the answers to Trivial Pursuit questions even if I had no other exposure to the topic. It shows that the problem with memory is not necessarily ability, but often attention. Parents often act as if their children are incapable of learning basic Bible facts or memorizing Bible verses, but those same children can quote every Disney movie they have seen verbatim. While our memory may not function as well as we age, we can compensate by focusing on the right things to remember. Paul emphasized this in Philippians 4:8 when he wrote, “Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things” (Phil. 4:8). In Psalm 77 the descendants of Asaph provide yet another important aspect of memory and the importance of choice. During times of turmoil, memories can quickly turn to better times, leading to self-pity and despair. However, if instead we choose to remember these things from a spiritual perspective, focused on God, they can lead us away from despair and toward greater faith.

When the psalmist cried out to God because of how badly he hurt inside, he refused the comfort available and chose a sleepless night instead (Psa. 77:1-2). He remembered God enough to pray, but his dismay caused him to complain rather than reflect (Psa. 77:3). Most have experienced similar situations, times when we faced a problem to which no solution seemed possible, something that kept us up at night. We not only lacked the correct answer, we did not even know where to begin explaining the problem (Psa. 77:4).  During times like these, it can be easy to become impatient and demanding with God—so much that we can blame Him for our problems because He does not immediately ease our pain. We question God, but we do not really think about the answers He has provided (Psa. 77:5-9). However, while Asaph felt this way at first, he eventually gained a greater perspective. Rather than comparing his plight to past deliverances God made possible, He recognized that the important thing to remember is that God did indeed make that possible and deliver (Psa. 77:10). If we would take the time to read through the Bible and reflect on what God did for His people, then we cannot but be impressed (Psa. 77:11-12). For when we then approach God in worship and humble ourselves in greater reflection, we realize just how great He truly is (Psa. 77:13). He has shown His power, declared His strength, and exhibited His love from the beginning of time (Psa. 77:14-19). He led Israel out of Egypt (Psa. 77:20), and He sent Jesus to lead us out of our sin (Matt. 11:28-30; 26:28; Acts 2:38; 1 Jn. 1:5-10). These are the things we need to remember when we are facing trials. God is still there, and God still cares (1 Pet. 5:7). We just need to remember it.

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